That Froggy Feeling…


Body… Achy, Blurry, Exhausted, Headache, Froggy

Mind… Foggy, chance of meatballs

Mood… Huh, what?

In order to keep my voice clear as possible, my doctor made it clear that I should not have any dairy… at all.
ME:  So that means, cow dairy, right? Since I’m allergic to it.
DR:  No dairy.
ME:  But specifically no cow’s dairy.
DR: No dairy at all.
ME: How about Sheep? Like Sheep’s Feta, I’m not allergic to Sheep.
DR: No dairy.
ME: Goat?
DR: …
So, I like dairy, and it sucks that I shouldn’t have any.  Anyway, since I cut dairy out completely, there has been a little less junk going on down on the chords.
But, of course, one Friday night, knowing full well what I was doing, we went for Italian food.
Now, overall, I did pretty good. I had the bow tie pasta dish with steak tidbits, broccoli and sundried tomatoes in a garlic sauce.
See, no dairy.  Except…
Ahhh… garlic bread, how much do I love thee? Let me count the ways.  Oh, about two baskets.  All that yummy, warm, crusty bread with buttery garlic.  And let’s not forget the lovely yeast in the bread.  Did I mention that I have an allergy to yeast?  I’m sure I did in a previous post.
ME: What about butter?  That’s not dairy, right?
DR:  Meh.
So, I woke up the next morning all congested, face puffy, back of throat thick with junk.  That’s why I did this on a Friday night, I should be clear by Sunday.
I know I ‘shouldn’t’ have, but I did.  I am testing how things work, one food at a time, but two bread baskets filled with butter and yeast, was a little overboard.  Garlic bread is done for a while.  Chicken (allergic to chicken and turkey) is next.  Definitely on a Friday.


In order to keep my voice as clear as possible, my doctor said NO DAIRY at all.


ME:  So that means, cow dairy, right?  Since I’m allergic to COW dairy?

DR:  No dairy.

ME:  But specifically no cow’s dairy?

DR: No dairy at all.

ME: How about sheep? Like sheep’s feta?  I’m not allergic to sheep.

DR: No dairy.  At all.

ME: Goat?

DR: …


So, I LOVE dairy, (cheese especially) and it sucks that I shouldn’t have any.  Anyway, since I cut out dairy, there has been a little less junk down on the chords, meaning less work and strain for my voice-overs.


Avoiding dairy, not to mention other types of foodstuffs, makes eating out tedious and boring.  Well, a couple of Friday’s ago we went for Italian food.   I did okay–I had the bow tie pasta dish with steak tidbits, broccoli, sun dried tomatoes in garlic and olive oil.  (It was delicious–Portofino’s in Forest Hills, I highly recommend it.)


See, no dairy.  Except…


Ahhh… garlic bread, how much do I love thee?!  Let me count the ways.  Oh, about two baskets.  All that yummy, warm, crusty bread with buttery garlic.  And let’s not forget the lovely yeast in the bread.  Did I mention that I have an allergy to yeast?  I’m sure I did in a previous post.


ME: What about butter?  That’s not dairy, right?

DR:  Meh.


So, I woke up the next morning all congested, face puffy, back of throat thick with junk.  That’s why I did this on a Friday night, I should be clear for work by Monday.  Sort of.


I know I ‘shouldn’t’ have, but I did.  I am testing how things work, one food at a time, but two bread baskets filled with butter and yeast, was a little overboard.  While staying away from dairy helps minimize that froggy feeling, I have other food allergies that can dramatically effect my voice without any junk ( mucous/phlegm), just inflammation.


So, anyway, garlic bread is done for a while.  Chicken (allergic to chicken and turkey) is next.  Definitely on a Friday.


FYI – All these various food allergies did not appear until after several years with Chronic Lyme.




4 Comments, Comment or Ping

  1. Ashley

    I am sorry to hear about your health problems, but you seem a little whiney and ungrateful to me. I have become so allergic to everything that I am alternating between only being able to eat broth made from boiling chicken bones and celery or eating plain white rice with no salt or seasoning….for seven years! I can’t believe you are complainin about dairy. Be thankful, you ingrate!

    March 30th, 2010

  2. amy dockery

    Just ran across this blog. I sure hope you are feeling better!! I’ve had lyme a little over a year. I was just surfing to figure out if lyme affects the voice. I can’t sing anymore, and I’m a songwriter. Demos are not sounding too good these days…

    July 1st, 2010

  3. TheLymey

    Ashley… I’m sorry for your health problems, as well. While this blog was started with the intent of putting a cynical, yet humorous, spin on my experience with Chronic Lyme, I am aware that there are people, such as yourself, that are a lot worse off and may not find my viewpoint even moderately funny. That said, I am grateful for many things in my life, yet it is my experience with chronic lyme that I’m riffing on — no one else’s, so I think I’m entitled to a little good-natured whining, particularly when it affects my livelihood (voice-overs) in such a devastating manner. My riffing is what helps me cope and keep on going. Be well.

    July 6th, 2010

  4. TheLymey

    Amy… I hear you. For me, what I find that affects me vocally is the excess mucus I’ve mentioned in my posts, occasional allergy-related inflammation (still haven’t found all culprits on this) and the fatigue aspect of chronic lyme/chronic fatigue syndrome. When I’m having a bad symptom cycle, I could be in good voice, but it only lasts for what feels like five minutes of steady work. Then it simply ‘thins’ out and fades. Goes from rich resonance to papery thin. I’m guessing that, since the rest of the muscles in my body feels like anchors are chaining them down, my vocal apparatus and supporting muscles are feeling the same. When this is going on, I’ve found myself straining just to keep things going, which makes things worse. Other pieces to add to this are the mental fatigue symptoms. On bad days, it’s hard to focus on the words on the page, let alone make decisions on what needs to be communicated, or how and why.

    Still, all of this has helped me to be a better artist and technician. I have learned how not to push when things aren’t working. To take a step back, let go, relax and start again. And… this is the hardest part… when things are just not working, to accept it and move on. That what is going on in that particular moment will not necessarily be what happens in the next. This lesson has resonated in other areas of my life as well. I guess it’s something I needed to learn. Best of luck.

    July 6th, 2010

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